Paul Cadmus’ masterful ability to illustrate the human form is exemplified in this set of three etchings from 1984, entitled Nudo 1-3. Exceptional impressions with strong contrasts, each is signed, titled and numbered 14/100 in the lower margin.

Found in our upcoming auction of 19th & 20th Century Prints & Drawings held on September 23rd and 24th.

The 20th Century portion of our upcoming auction on September 23rd and 24th of 19th & 20th Century Prints and Drawings, will not only feature a strong assortment of Modern works by Picasso, Chagall and Matisse but also highlights from artists such as Max Beckmann.
Beckmann’s lithograph entitled Die Nacht from 1919, featured above, is a prime example of German Expressionism. Portraying the violence and brutality of the riots which swept Berlin in November 1918 with the founding of the Weimar Republic, Beckmann illustrates two figures being tortured in a dilapidated garret by several menacing-looking thugs.

The 20th Century portion of our upcoming auction on September 23rd and 24th of 19th & 20th Century Prints and Drawings, will not only feature a strong assortment of Modern works by Picasso, Chagall and Matisse but also highlights from artists such as Max Beckmann.

Beckmann’s lithograph entitled Die Nacht from 1919, featured above, is a prime example of German Expressionism. Portraying the violence and brutality of the riots which swept Berlin in November 1918 with the founding of the Weimar Republic, Beckmann illustrates two figures being tortured in a dilapidated garret by several menacing-looking thugs.

Showcasing New York City’s glory, in all degrees of varying weather and times of day and night, are Martin Lewis’ wonderfully luminous impressions. 

From the top: Little Penthouse, 1931. Stoops in the Snow, 1930. Quarter of Nine, “Saturday’s Children”, 1929.

All featured in our upcoming auction of 19th & 20th Century Prints & Drawings being held on September 23rd and 24th.

smithsonianlibraries:

Hints to Young Yacht Skippers is the name of the book and “don’t go in the water” is hint #1.
The shark pictured (obviously showing off) is a Great White Shark, Carcharodon carcharias, which you can find in the Biodiversity Heritage Library’s Shark Week Collection, or their Flickr set, Sharks!

Really though, the world needs more gifs made from plates in books. 

smithsonianlibraries:

Hints to Young Yacht Skippers is the name of the book and “don’t go in the water” is hint #1.

The shark pictured (obviously showing off) is a Great White Shark, Carcharodon carcharias, which you can find in the Biodiversity Heritage Library’s Shark Week Collection, or their Flickr set, Sharks!

Really though, the world needs more gifs made from plates in books. 

archivesofamericanart:

Have you used your passport this summer? These artists’ passports found in the Archives, have got us itching to travel before fall sets in, and also reveal something of the holder.

Guy Pène Du Bois and Dorothy Liebes were both quite fashionable, as evidenced by their passport photos (something we can only aspire to after a long haul flight). Jackson Pollock’s passport tells us he was missing part of his right index finger. 

Top to bottom: Guy Pène Du Bois’ passport, 1929 April 16. Guy Pène Du Bois papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Dorothy Liebes’ passport, 1958. Dorothy Liebes papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Jackson Pollock’s passport, 1955 July 21. Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

For racing fans, these Monaco Grand Prix posters might make you feel as though you’re racing through the streets of the small principality.

From our upcoming Vintage Posters auction on August 6th, both posters were designed by Georges Hamel in 1933 (top) and 1936 (bottom).

For in-depth descriptions, read the following from our catalogue: 

Top: “The Monaco Grand Prix, a Formula One motor race through the streets of Monte Carlo in the small principality on the French Riviera, was first held in 1929. Organized by the Automobile Club of Monaco it was the first race to be held solely within the country’s borders. Robert Falcucci designed the posters for the race’s 2nd, 3rd and 4th meetings using dynamic, street level views of the powerful automobiles and the exotic vistas and landmarks of the city. Using a similar style and graphic treatment Geo Ham designed this poster and then continued to design for the event through 1937 and then again in 1948. ‘To accentuate the speed of the race, he set [this] scene as a spectacular, road-level perspective placing the viewer only a few yards behind the speeding ‘French Blue’ Bugatti just exiting the tunnel a few lengths behind a red Alfa Romeo and several other cars as they approach the finish line’ (Crouse p. 24). Crouse p. 25, Riviera 259, Affiches Automobiles cover and p. 92, Riviera 259, Azur 333.”

Bottom: “This poster “brilliantly depicts the battle between the Germans and the Italians in the Monaco race. Here a stylish Auto Union GL, the first of the rear-engine racecars, leads a red Alfa Romeo through an extremely tight turn. This masterful portrayal of the intense competition at the races is wonderfully contrasted to the normally serene harbor and city. Ham’s orange-tinted course amplifies the heat of the race and his white speed lines accentuate the velocity of the cars” (Crouse p. 30). Crouse p. 31, Riviera 261.”

Seen in our upcoming Vintage Posters auction on August 6th, these vivid images of a celebrated Wild West figure are even more captivating in person. 

The first poster, Col. W.F. Cody/”Buffalo Bill” from 1908, is what comes to mind when one talks about a “classic poster.” A description from our catalogue elaborates:

"One frequently speaks of a ‘classic’ poster of a famous person. It is meant to denote a poster which shows that individual to his best advantage, possibly at the summit of his career, serving to summarize his achievements and distill all his qualities into one final graphic statement … and there can be no question but that all the qualities that go into making such a poster are at work here. In 1908 [Buffalo Bill] was no longer at the height of his career, but he is surely sitting tall in the saddle, firmly in control of any situation, and his steadfast gaze seems to be one which looks forwards, as if to say, ‘The show must go on,’ and at the same time pensively looks back to a life full of the kind of action that no one would ever live through again. Doffing his Stetson with one hand he is both welcoming us and bidding us farewell; what matters is that the other hand is firmly holding the reins. There is no question about it, this is ‘the classic Cody’" (Buffalo Bill p. 16). Buffalo Bill 112 (var)."

The second, circa 1905, is a rare poster depicting scenes from Buffalo Bill’s life. Read its catalogue description here:

A rare poster comprised of scenes from Cody’s life, which previously appeared on two earlier Buffalo Bill posters, primarily Scenes in the Life of Col. W. F. Cody, 1895, and also three vignettes from Chief of Scouts and Guide for U.S. Army, circa 1888 (see Buffalo Bill p. 37 and p. 53). The 1895 poster, which was a horizontal format without a central bust image of Cody, features small, full-color scenes of Cody, as well as the busts of four U.S. Presidents: Grant, Arthur, Cleveland and Benjamin Harrison. Appearing on this French poster is the bust of just one President, William McKinley, elected in 1897. There are also two small vignettes that do not appear on either of the earlier posters; one for Cody Day at the Omaha Exposition (which was inaugurated in 1898), and an image of Bill’s first cabin. There exists an English variation of this poster, printed by the Enquirer Litho. Company in Cincinnati, dated 1899. Buffalo Bill toured France twice during his lengthy career; the first time in 1889, and the second and final time in 1905.”

smithsonianlibraries:

No, this isn’t American Horror Story: Freak Show. It’s the Animated Circus Book, story by Edward Ernest, animated by Julian Wehr (1943) from our collection of movable books at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian National Design Museum Library.
It was one of the books in our exhibit on paper engineering, Fold, Pull, Pop & Turn that we put on a few years ago.  You can see more videos of these books in our Paper Engineering Videos collection on Flickr. We’ve put pictures of movable books in our Pop-ups and Movables, also on Flickr.

smithsonianlibraries:

No, this isn’t American Horror Story: Freak Show. It’s the Animated Circus Book, story by Edward Ernest, animated by Julian Wehr (1943) from our collection of movable books at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian National Design Museum Library.

It was one of the books in our exhibit on paper engineering, Fold, Pull, Pop & Turn that we put on a few years ago.  You can see more videos of these books in our Paper Engineering Videos collection on Flickr. We’ve put pictures of movable books in our Pop-ups and Movables, also on Flickr.

Who doesn’t love a beautiful Alphonse Mucha Art Nouveau poster? Learn about this Flirt poster from 1899, featured in our upcoming auction of Vintage Posters on August 6th, from our catalogue: 
"Mucha reinforces this biscuit advertisement by flawlessly incorporating the brand name and logo into the image. The Lefèvre-Utile name is visible in the wrought iron gate behind the couple, and initialed in the fabric of the woman’s dress; a quarter of an actual biscuit is depicted in the lower left corner. This is the first edition of the poster. In 1900, it was reissued after the company won a grand prize at the World’s Fair in Paris, with the words Grand Prix - Paris 1900 printed to the left of Mucha’s signature. In addition to posters, Mucha also designed packaging for this famous biscuit company.”

Who doesn’t love a beautiful Alphonse Mucha Art Nouveau poster? Learn about this Flirt poster from 1899, featured in our upcoming auction of Vintage Posters on August 6th, from our catalogue: 

"Mucha reinforces this biscuit advertisement by flawlessly incorporating the brand name and logo into the image. The Lefèvre-Utile name is visible in the wrought iron gate behind the couple, and initialed in the fabric of the woman’s dress; a quarter of an actual biscuit is depicted in the lower left corner. This is the first edition of the poster. In 1900, it was reissued after the company won a grand prize at the World’s Fair in Paris, with the words Grand Prix - Paris 1900 printed to the left of Mucha’s signature. In addition to posters, Mucha also designed packaging for this famous biscuit company.”